A passion for birds and a message of grace

Winter warm brahms
Fragility. © Charles Thibo

Grace – this idea was at the heart of a composition of Olivier Messiaen, conceived in 1990. The French composer first considered writing an oboe concerto for his friend Heinz Holliger (born 1939). His ideas later evolved into a piece for oboe, cello, piano, harp and orchestra: Concert à 4 (Quadruple Concert). He drew his inspiration from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Domenico Scarlatti and Jean-Philippe Rameau as well as from his transcriptions of bird songs, Messiaen’s trademark.

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Expressing silence through sounds

Mount Fuji © Raoul Ries

A jazz piece? No. A piano piece? Yes. Single steps? No. An uninterrupted rest? Yes. Motionless, static through rhythm and melody. A singular work. A Japanese work. Tore Takemitsu. A singular sombre, heavy atmosphere, enhanced by isolated notes, clear as rain drops. Death? An uninterrupted rest. An eternal sleep. How little do we know. How little time do we have to learn. How much time and effort we waste to stay ignorant.

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A shining white alliance between old and new

The Saviour. © Charles Thibo

200 performers. No less. A mixed choir, seven instrumental soloists and a large orchestra. Was it the magnitude of the biblical event that inspired Olivier Messiaen to this extraordinary large-scale work? The Transfiguration of Christ is narrated by Luke: Jesus took his followers Peter, John and Jacob to the top of a mountain to pray. During their common prayer, Jesus garments turned into a shining white – he is being transfigured by a celestial light. Moses and Elijah appear and talk to Jesus while Jacob, John and Peter fall to the ground, terrified by this supernatural event.

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Meeting the Master of Total Serialism at a hotspot

If the hammer is without a master, it might get some crazy ideas of its own! © Charles Thibo
If the hammer is without a master, it might get some crazy ideas of its own! © Charles Thibo

A few hours before I started to write this post, the death of Pierre Boulez made the headlines. A controversial person, if I trust my Twitter timeline. Was he the chief representative of contemporary classical music? Of French contemporary classical music? A polemic person and a conductor with too much political influence? As a matter of fact, I am not sure that these questions matter. Music matters.

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