While the winds blow across the lands

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The sweetness of autumn. © Charles Thibo
Herr: Es ist Zeit. Der Sommer war sehr groß.
Leg deinen Schatten auf die Sonnenuhren,
und auf den Fluren lass die Winde los.

Befiehl den letzten Früchten, voll zu sein;
gib ihnen noch zwei südlichere Tage,
dränge sie zur Vollendung hin, und jage
die letzte Süße in den schweren Wein.

Wer jetzt kein Haus hat, baut sich keines mehr.
Wer jetzt allein ist, wird es lange bleiben,
wird wachen, lesen, lange Briefe schreiben
und wird in den Alleen hin und her
unruhig wandern, wenn die Blätter treiben.1
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Intimate thoughts and feelings for a dying friend

Sadness. © Charles Thibo

It’s raining outside. While we did not have enough rain in June and July, nature seems to catch up now. The climate is changing. We are experiencing weather extremes: droughts, floods. Resignation. I can do my best to reduce my carbon footprint, but sometimes it feels so pointless. A disheartening feeling, difficult to suppress. It takes a real effort to convince myself over and over again: Every step counts. Every step counts. Let’s not loose hope.

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A work in progress – half serenade, half symphony

 

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Jubilant splendor. © Charles Thibo

“Sonnez cors et trompettes!” (Sound the horns and trumpets).  This French expression came to my mind when I listened to Johannes Brahms Serenade No. 1 in D, Op. 11, especially to the jubilant first movement. It has been recorded by the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, back to back with Schumann’s Cello Concerto that I have presented in a post two days ago. I never had really cared to listen to Brahms’ serenade in D consciously before I began to study Schumann’s piece. An omission I later regretted! Because… because it is incredibly beautiful, rich, melodious – very much a reverence to Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. It displays an overall sunny, optimistic mood, a piece that requires no effort to listen to and has no deeper meaning thant to give the audience 55 minutes of pleasure.

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Brahms’ unfulfilled love – a detached look back

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Desire – temptation. © Charles Thibo

Johannes Brahms’ music has made it into more than one novel of worldwide fame. The obvious one is “Aimez-vous Brahms?” (English title: Goodbye Again) published by the French author Françoise Sagan in 1959. In 1987,  the Japanese writer Haruki Murakami highlights in his novel “Norwegian Wood” both Brahms’ Symphony No. 4 and his Piano Concerto No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 83. Sagan and Murakami wrote love stories, very different in style, set in a different social context but with a common subject: sexual desire, moral conventions and unfulfilled love, topics linked to Brahms, his biography and his music.

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