Haydn’s solemn trumpet concerto bridges the gap

However grey winter may be, Haydn is going to light it up. © Charles Thibo
However grey winter may be, Haydn is going to light it up. © Charles Thibo

New Year’s Eve is only a few days away – time to look back and think about missed chances and mistakes made over the year… and when I look back at my blog, I realize I didn’ write a single post about Haydn. What? No Haydn? Oh, my! This will not stand and without further ado, sound trumpets for Haydn’s fantastic Trumpet Concerto in E flat (Hob.VIIe.1). Joseph Haydn wrote it in 1796 for the Klappentrompete (keyed trumpet), invented by Anton Weidinger and precursor to our modern piston trumpet. The concerto’s contemporary name could be misleading, it was originally published as a “Concerto per il clarino, E♭”

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Celestial music interpreted by a jazz panist

Händel - music descended from heaven. © Charles Thibo
Händel – music descended from heaven. © Charles Thibo

Händel is everywhere. At least in the German town of Halle/Saale, just like Mozart in Salzburg. I lived for many years in Halle, and for a long time, I kept my distance to that Baroque composer. Being constantly exposed to his “Feuerwerksmusik” (Music for the Royal Fireworks, HWV 351) and his “Wassermusik” (Water Music, HWV 348–350), I ended up hating his music.

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The Infidels praise the Lord

Vienna at Christmas time - the cupola of the Museum of Natural History. © Charles Thibo
Vienna at Christmas time – the cupola of the Museum of Natural History. © Charles Thibo

On Christmas Eve, I will honor a convinced agnostic: Camille de Saint-Saëns. The French composer’s life is marked by an interesting paradox. He preferred reason to faith, and still, for most of his career, he worked as an organist at the church La Madeleine in Paris. As such, he composed in 1858 a wonderful Christmas cantata in nine movements, the “Oratorio de Noël” Op. 12. It was performed for first time on December 25 of the same year in La Madeleine and dedicated to his pupil, the Viscountess de Grandval. Saint-Saëns had intensively studied the choral music of Bach, Händel and Mozart and makes an explicit reference to Bach in the “Prélude”. He had already composed a mass, his Op. 4, at that time.

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From Bethlehem He came

Light and hope. © Charles Thibo
Light and hope. © Charles Thibo

Christmas Eve is two days away, and Christmas carols and Christmas pop songs might by now have poisoned your ears. Here is an antidote. Is pure, joyful and pacifying. It is solemn without veering into kitsch. It’s classy. It’s over 300 years old, but not outdated. It’s perfect for Christmas.

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