The Infidels praise the Lord

Vienna at Christmas time - the cupola of the Museum of Natural History. © Charles Thibo
Vienna at Christmas time – the cupola of the Museum of Natural History. © Charles Thibo

On Christmas Eve, I will honor a convinced agnostic: Camille de Saint-Saëns. The French composer’s life is marked by an interesting paradox. He preferred reason to faith, and still, for most of his career, he worked as an organist at the church La Madeleine in Paris. As such, he composed in 1858 a wonderful Christmas cantata in nine movements, the “Oratorio de Noël” Op. 12. It was performed for first time on December 25 of the same year in La Madeleine and dedicated to his pupil, the Viscountess de Grandval. Saint-Saëns had intensively studied the choral music of Bach, Händel and Mozart and makes an explicit reference to Bach in the “Prélude”. He had already composed a mass, his Op. 4, at that time.

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From Bethlehem He came

Light and hope. © Charles Thibo
Light and hope. © Charles Thibo

Christmas Eve is two days away, and Christmas carols and Christmas pop songs might by now have poisoned your ears. Here is an antidote. Is pure, joyful and pacifying. It is solemn without veering into kitsch. It’s classy. It’s over 300 years old, but not outdated. It’s perfect for Christmas.

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About words

© Charles Thibo
© Charles Thibo

For some time I have thought about explaining some unavoidable technical terms of musicology in a separate section. The section just saw the light. All terms explained in this new section will be marked by an * and linked to the section. I hope this will make the posts even more readable. Have a nice weekend.

© Charles Thibo

The Northern Light descended from Bergen

The harbour of Oslo. (c) Charles Thibo
The harbour of Oslo. (c) Charles Thibo

The first cadences could well illustrate the moment a discoverer’s ship leaves the port of Oslo: majestic, full of hope, peaceful. But Edvard Grieg had something totally different in mind when he composed the “Holberg Suite”, Op. 40. He had been tasked to write a piece to commemorate the 200th birthday of the Danish poet Ludvig Holberg (1684-1754). Continue reading!