Painting the sea with colour and music

The sea - a favourite subject of painters and composers alike. © Charles Thibo
The sea – a favourite subject of painters and composers alike. © Charles Thibo

If Pyotr Tchaikovsky is my all time favourite composer, Claude Monet is my all time favourite painter. He and others of his time from the school of the “Impressionists”, who tried to render in their paintings the immediate and ephemerous effects of light: shadows, reflections by the sun, flickering of waves, distortion by fog etc. While other painters had a political or religious message or tried to express an artistic ideal (romanticism for example), Monet and his friends painted nature as they saw it and when they saw it, that is, outdoor and on the spot, a recurrent subject being the sea.

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Addicted to Schubert and romanticism

Reading Rilke. I am fascinated by the Romantic Period. © Charles Thibo
Reading Rilke.© Charles Thibo

Schubert. Schubert? That’s the title of a biography of the Austrian composer Franz Schubert and it highlights the fact that Schubert has been totally underrated during his lifetime – the early 19th century – and is still subject to many prejudices and misunderstandings. He has become famous for his “Lieder” (songs), as he set into music many, many poems. The best known are probably “Die Forelle” (The Trout; text by Christian Schubart), “Der Erlkönig” (The Erlking; text by Johann Wolfgang v. Goethe) and the song cycles “Die schöne Müllerin” and “Winterreise” (The Lovely Miller’s Wife, Winter Journey; poems by Wilhelm Müller). Schubert was a prolific composer (>1500 works) and is one of the top representatives of the German romantic period.

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Piano, pianissimo – about teaching

I find it hard to pass that piano without touching it. © Charles Thibo
I find it hard to pass that piano without touching it. © Charles Thibo

A year ago, I decided to start learning to play the piano – after mulling over this secret wish for many years. I am extremely motivated and that’s why I am sorry to realize that over the past 200 years, piano lessons have been a headache for pupils and teachers alike. At least that is the impression I get from reading biographies of composers. All complain about untalented, unmotivated and/or undisciplined pupils, while the pupils themselves lament over monotonous lessons and uninspired teachers. In the 18th and 19th century, many composers had to earn their living by giving lessons. This was not exactly the best motivation, I guess. Today however, music schools produce dedicated teachers with at least some pedagogical training, training material is abundant, and it still seems to be hard to motivate pupils to stick with their lessons.

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