The Communists didn’t like funky sound experiments

Ligeti's "Musica Ricercata" is about contrasts. © Charles Thibo
Ligeti’s “Musica Ricercata” is about contrasts. © Charles Thibo

The Communist Party did not welcome revolutions that it had not initiated itself. György Ligeti was not welcome, nor was his music. Not in Hungary, when it was ruled by the Communist Party. But the Communist world broke apart and Ligeti’s music stays on. He is certainly one of the greatest composers of classical music of the 20th century. Et pour cause, as they say in France.

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Searching for the salvation of the soul

Faith, hope and deliverance from all sins - a fresco in the Vatican. © Charles Thibo
Faith, hope and deliverance from all sins – a fresco in the Vatican. © Charles Thibo

Are you looking for answers on this first day of the year? Are you pondering the meaning of life? I would like to invite you to board my time-machine and return to the year 1600. The Renaissance is almost over, the Baroque era has not yet begun. Our destination is Italy, where we meet the composer, organist and choreograph Emilio di Cavalieri’s and enjoy his monumental work “Rappresentatione di anima, et di corpo”, that some consider as the first oratorio ever. You don’t speak Italian? Don’t worry, the music speaks for itself. Continue reading!

Listening to Schubert at my meditation spot

This place breathes the spirit of Romanticism. © Charles Thibo
This place breathes the spirit of Romanticism. © Charles Thibo

49.5813° N 6.3088° E is the position of one of my meditation spots. It lies on my way home when I drive to or come from work, and when I have had a particularly busy day at the office, I sometimes stop there for a few minutes to contemplate the landscape, its colors changing with the seasons or a particularly nice sunset. On the day I wrote this post, December 28, it wasn’t the need for a quiet moment that made me stop there. As I drove by, I noticed for the first time the particular shape of that broken tree with the blue morning sky in the background. A castle in ruins? A finger pointing to the sky?

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Haydn’s solemn trumpet concerto bridges the gap

However grey winter may be, Haydn is going to light it up. © Charles Thibo
However grey winter may be, Haydn is going to light it up. © Charles Thibo

New Year’s Eve is only a few days away – time to look back and think about missed chances and mistakes made over the year… and when I look back at my blog, I realize I didn’ write a single post about Haydn. What? No Haydn? Oh, my! This will not stand and without further ado, sound trumpets for Haydn’s fantastic Trumpet Concerto in E flat (Hob.VIIe.1). Joseph Haydn wrote it in 1796 for the Klappentrompete (keyed trumpet), invented by Anton Weidinger and precursor to our modern piston trumpet. The concerto’s contemporary name could be misleading, it was originally published as a “Concerto per il clarino, E♭”

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