A jestful piece hiding Mozart’s desperation

Hey, hey, Mister Postman! © Charles Thibo

Illustrating this post required some undercover work. I had the idea to write something about Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Serenade for Winds and Strings in D major “Posthorn” (KV 320) since last year’s summer. And I knew that many years ago, postmen in Luxembourg wore caps with a posthorn. Nowadays, they wear basecaps with a modern logo that has no charm at all. So where could I get a picture of such a cap? The post museum was one option, but all the stuff is exhibited behind protective and reflecting glass.

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Standing in awe before the Waldstein-Sonata

Monumental. © Charles Thibo

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 21 in C major (Op. 53) is one of those ambitions of mine. Some day in the future, I will be able to play this overwhelming piece. Overwhelming because it overwhelms me each time I listen to it. Overwhelming because it commands respect to the apprentice I still am. This love affair started with a recording by Alice Sara Ott. I moved on to the release of Emil Gilels’ performance and ended up with Alfred Brendel’s recording, apparently the gold standard when it cones to Beethoven interpretation.

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In the data maze or a hype of Beethovian scale

Beethoven Fifth final
No notes, no music. © Charles Thibo

Tadadadaaa – the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is effective as of now! Can you feel it? Does it make a difference? No, it doesn’t. It reminds me of the question: “So how does it feel to turn 40?” Well, the world did not stop turning back then, did it? And it didn’t tonight. All this excitement in the blogosphere over the past weeks – I wonder whether we are not taking all this a little too serious.

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Light-heartedness bordering Mozartian frivolity

Rosetti oboe concerto
Rosa, rosae, rosae… © Charles Thibo

He was a contemporary of Mozart and Haydn, but he developed his own style. You can hear some of Mozart’s sweet- and lightness and his thematic ideas are developed in way similiar to Haydn’s, especially in the symphonies. He did not become as famous as the two masters of the Vienna classic era even though he was a prolific composer. So who is he? Antonio Rosetti is his name; he was born as Anton Rösler in Litomerice in Bohemia around 1750 and opted later for the Italian form of his name, most likely for marketing reasons. As for his biography, the scholars have now dressed a precise register of what they don’t know, for what they know about him with certainty – it is not much.

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