Murder, madness and stirring melodies

Delusions. © Charles Thibo

“Du blanc, rien que du blanc! Je suis la mariée!”1 Ophelia has lost herself once more in her delusions. The grief over the death of her father Polonius, killed inadvertently by Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, has driven her crazy. What a tragedy! While Hamlet feigns to be mad to plan in secrecy the death of King Claudius, brother and murderer of Hamlet’s father, Ophelia, the woman he loves, has succumbed to true madness because her father Polonius’s death through Hamlet’s hand. William Shakespeare’s play “Hamlet” is one of my favourites, and Pyotr Tchaikovsky has composed in January 1891 a wonderful incidental music inspired by the play.

Continue reading!

A song, a dance and the spirit of Russia

© Charles Thibo

Few symphonies have such a characteristic introduction – once you’ve heard it, you will recognize it at once. And from the texture of the introduction you will know the name of the composer: Pyotr Tchaikovsky. I marvel at this symphony’s beauty, at its dynamics, its melodic lines, its lyricism – a song, a dance, all imbued by the spirit of Russia: Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64.  And I love the recording by the Russian National Orchestra under Mikhail Pletnev.

Continue reading!

Twelve miniatures for a handful of rubles

tchaikovsky_saesons
December. © Charles Thibo

The passing of the year – quite a number of composers took this as an inspiration. Antonio Vivaldi did it, of course, with his violin concertos known as “Le Quattro Stagioni”, then Fanny Mendelssohn leading us with her piano cycle “Das Jahr” from month to month. Just like Fanny Tchaikovsky leads us through the year in 12 piano pieces grouped in the cycle “The Seasons”, Op. 37. The pieces had been commissioned by the St. Petersburg music journal “Nuvellist” (Нувеллист). Each piece has a title emphasizing an emotion or an event, each is introduced in the original publication by an epitaph and accompanied by an illustration.

Continue reading!

Into the morning with Skryabin’s sound-painting

Turning point. © Charles Thibo.

Do you remember this strange composer who created a whole world around himself and declared “I am God”? Alexander Skryabin, the mystic among Russia’s most famous composers. I love his piano sonatas and to greet this beautiful day, I invite you to listen to Piano Sonata No. 2 in G sharp minor, Op. 19. It has two movements and a defined tonality – Skryabin wrote it between 1892 and 1897 while he was still a young man and remained loyal to the musical conventions of the 19th century. By the time he would write his tenth piano sonata, that we have discovered in an earlier post, he would have left all this behind.

Continue reading!