Evolution Yes, Revolution No!

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Composition in Blue. © Charles Thibo

Something new, definitely. A premiere for me. Interesting, stimulating. It made me reflect my expectations. It immediately connected to my emotions. I felt there was a message, but initially I saw only the outlines, the details needed time to become visible. A piece growing organically out of itself. Harsh contrasts, gentle melodies, progression… Henri Dutilleux’ orchestral piece “Métaboles”, that I heard yesterday at the Philharmonie de Luxembourg, was a pleasant surprise.

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Harmony and Dark Chaos from Debussy’s Pen

Debussy cello sonata
Art has no age. © Charles Thibo

Children made this piece of art. It immediately caught my attention. Cones painted in dazzling colours. The contrast between natural and artificial. Here’s a piece of music that has such contrasts too. And it retained my attention for a much longer time span than those cones, even if they get an honorary mention on this blog: Sonata for Cello and Piano in D Minor (L. 135), written by Claude Debussy and recorded by Sol Gabetta and Hélène Grimaud. Brace yourself, for you are in for a wild ride through the realm of chords and harmonies.

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No to harmony, yes to melody

Safe haven. © Charles Thibo

A prayer or rather an incantation. Maurice Ravel on a Japan inspired rave? At the turn of the last century many French artists became infatuated with Japan’s traditional art – its painting, its music, its haiku literature. Between 1920 and 1922 Ravel wrote his Sonata for Violin and Cello, M. 73; he dedicated it to Claude Debussy, and I detect at least a hint of the Asian concept of minimalism and purity in this piece. Ravel wrote it in his safe haven “Le Belvédère”, located in Montfort l’Amaury, 50 km south-west of Paris, inspired every day by his Japanese garden.

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Looking at the world with a child’s eyes

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A new day. © Charles Thibo

Gabriel Fauré’s String Quartet in E minor (Op. 121) will forever be associated in my mind with the morning after I had heard Debussy’s quartet. Debussy’s piece had had a deep and lasting impact upon me the day before. I rose in the morning to drive to work, and while I drove by that field in the picture I immersed myself in the first movement of Fauré’s piece. The field, the sun, the sky, the music…

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