Absolute Music for Bach’s Ladies’ Night

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Sydney-Hamburg. © Charles Thibo

Music lovers will of course know that this is the Sydney Opera House. Many years ago I had the pleasure to enjoy an opera in Sydney, but this post is not about any opera. It’s about money. About making music a profitable business. Carl Philipp Emmanuel Bach, the son of Johann Sebastian Bach, had to make money. Of course, he had a job back then in 1768. In March he had succeeded Georg Philipp Telemann as the musical director and Kantor in Hamburg. But his salary was low, and only four weeks after he had settled down in Hamburg, he announced his first public concert. It was a success and Bach immediately scheduled a second one. He gave regular concerts on a subscription basis until 1771, when he would start to run out of subscribers.

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“Music Must First of All Move the Hearts”

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Clarity. © Charles Thibo

The music of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, the second of Johann Sebastian Bach’s sons, is not only worth a detour, it is worth going back on our own’s tracks. Simply because it’s beautiful, uplifting and a perfect start into a new day. This summer, I presented Bach’s Cello Concerto in A Minor (Wq. 170), an arrangement of his Keyboard Concerto in A Minor (Wq. 26). The keyboard concerto will be the focal point of today’s post. As the cello version, it saw the light in 1750, ten years after Bach had joined the orchestra of the Prussian King Frederic II in Berlin. It was also the year his famous father died.

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Oriental Delights Anticipating Mozart’s Operas

“Zanaide” performed in Bad Lauchstädt. © Gert Mothes

Oriental exotics and intrigue, power struggles, impossible love, betrayal and reconciliation – those ingredients have tempted librettists and opera composers alike. How they dealt with it, had very much to do with the conventions of the time, the taste of the audience, and the availability of good singers. When Johann Christian Bach, the youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach, made his debut in London,  he was appalled by the lack of good singers, and though the King’s Theatre asked him in 1762 to write two operas, he initially refused. However, after the audition of several singers, he agreed, and in 1763, he presented an opera that had long been forgotten, and that I have discovered myself only very recently: Zanaida.

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Polyphony and Arias from the Second Bach Generation

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Welcome autumn! © Charles Thibo

There is no life without Bach, at least not for me, and the moment you are reading this, I will be far away from home, on the beach, sitting in the sand, looking at the blue sky and doing nothing. Nothing except reading, listening to Bach and perhaps pondering whether I will run once more across the beach and throw myself into the waves. Right, I am on my much deserved vacation while at home the grape harvest has begun and the weather is gradually changing into a familiar grey-with-occasional-rain pattern. Welcome autumn!

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