Chillout music from Northern Germany

Evening light. © Charles Thibo

Some composers inspire me a feeling of familiarity, of friendship, the kind of attachment you feel for someone you have known a long time, someone who is far away now, but whose bond with you remains strong, despite the time that has elapsed, despite the distance that separates you and him. Dieterich Buxtehude is one of these composers. A Baroque musician, a paragon for Johann Sebastian Bach and one of the most eminent composers of Northern Germany as we have seen in my first post about him. For today I have selected a secular piece that seems perfect to me either to start the day or to end it.

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Singularity through creativity

Admire me! © Charles Thibo

Look at this thimbleweed! It is pretty, isn’t it? It is an autumn flower and this year it was very early. I photographed it in the first week of August and I didn’t think about autumn yet. This flower is unique. It shares its genetic material with millions of its species and still no two flowers look the same. During growth – the replication of cellular DNA according to a precise plan – errors occur, spontaneous mutations happen. Most will not affect the shape or colour of the plant, some might. Some may affect the plant’s survival. Any major glitch in the DNA replication and the flower may perish. Nature is concerned with survival, not with creativity.

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Virtuosic writing for the court’s horn players

Sweet autumn. © Charles Thibo

A little melancholy is appropriate at this time of the year. The opening verse of that poem by Rainer Maria Rilke comes back to my mind: “Herr, es ist Zeit, der Sommer war sehr groß…” I quoted it at full length a year ago in a post on Johannes Brahms. Yes, the summer was impressive and it is time to say good-bye. And so I have picked a piece from the Baroque composer Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679 – 1745): the Capriccio No. 1 in D major (ZW 182), recorded by the Camerata Bern.

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Un air de Chopin signed Clara Wieck

Rêverie. © Charles Thibo

Ah, this woman! If only she had written more piano concerts, this world would be a better one. She only wrote one and so we will have to contend with the situation as it is and make the best of it by enjoying Clara Wieck’s Piano Concerto in A minor. A truly Romantic concerto, three movements – fast, slow, fast – and beautiful melodies to enjoy, a hint of nostalgia, quite a bit of energy and self-consciousness, gentleness and rêverie… beautiful! The music critic James Reel detects parallels to Frédéric Chopin, and indeed, the lightness, the brilliance, the sensitivity – un air de Chopin.

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