A metaphysical love on the coast of Cornwall

John Duncan has painted in 1912 the fateful moment of Tristan and Isolde drinking a love potion. (Courtesy City Art Centre, Edinburgh Museums and Galleries)
John Duncan has painted in 1912 the fateful moment of Tristan and Isolde drinking a love potion. (© City Art Centre, Edinburgh Museums and Galleries)

Love and death. Man enslaved by his passions. Man doomed because of his passions. Romance followed by tragedy. Tragedy on a supreme level. Audience devastated, in tears. Richard Wagner. I like Wagner. Ugh! Well, yes. If I have started this blog half a year ago, it is to a large degree Wagner’s fault. Let me explain: As a student I was fascinated by the nihilistic German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Two years ago, I read somewhere that Wagner was once Nietzsche’s idol, and so I bought a biography on Wagner. The book was full of interesting references to other composers and I bought more biographies. That was the moment I disappeared behind a pile of books about classical music. The start of a passion…

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